Roads to Cuyahoga Valley Initiative and the Environmental Landscape

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1. Running
Water Teacher Presentations

 

The summer institute began in a similar
fashion this morning to yesterday. Teacher participants presented their running water projects to one another. Connections were made between a fight over
water and change in Fairlawn and the Shaker Lakes recalling Monday’s Doan Brook
tour. Watershed areas in Fairlawn,
Hinckley, Rocky River, Parma, Green, Uniontown, Akron, and Kent were discussed
and related to the Doan Brook. Teacher
participants incorporated relevant vocabulary learned during the course of
these TAH workshops.

 

2. Tour
of the Cuyahoga River

 

Img_1074
Paul Alsenas, director of Cuyahoga County
Planning, and Allison Ball, special project coordinator for the same
department, led us on a day long multi-transportational tour of the Cuyahoga
River. We first travelled to Whisky
Island by bus and then walked to the, slightly, restored Coast Guard
station. The group then boarded the
vessel “The Holiday” and headed due south down “the crooked river.” Paul
provided commentary the duration of the boating trip. He pointed out local highlights such as bridges,
housing, industry, nature, and the history of the river’s development. Connections to the global market were made by
pointing out such companies as Essroc from France, Mittal Steel from India, and
Cargill from Italy who all do business next to the river. This was historicized by mentioning how the
Cuyahoga was used by Native Americans to trade as far south as the Gulf of
Mexico.

 

After ending the boat portion of the tour
at Mittal Steel’s loading dock, the group traversed other portions of the river
via bus again. The Cleveland neighborhood of Tremont and the steel valley left
us at the Canalway Visitor Center. There
the Metroparks provided us with a PowerPoint presentation of the newly acquired
West Creek Reservation. 

 Img_1024

A discussion on “place making” vs. “planning”
in regards to the constructed landscape was had on the bus ride to Mill Creek
Falls. Paul and Mark urged teacher
participants to think of the ways in which teachers are critical to this
paradigm shift in human relations to the natural world, particularly in cities
like Cleveland.

 

At Mills Creek Falls, part of the Garfield
Reservation, we had the opportunity to check out the newly developed 48 foot
falls, the tallest in the county. This
is a restored area that was largely unknown until approximately five years
ago. A representative of Slavic Village
Development Corporation joined the conversation here. The group took a chance to explore the area
and reflect on the effects of human interaction with the area.

 

The West Creek confluence with the Cuyahoga
River was visited next. Here the interconnectedness
of the river, the Metroparks, non-profits, industry, and county planning all
came to a head as a representative of a local West Creek preservation
organization chimed in. The tour was
concluded at Rosby Farm and Greenhouses along the eastern side of the river. Here, along with gardening and landscaping
supplies, Rosby services 65-85 trucks full of industrial and construction waste
for recycling purposes. Teachers were
treated to another educated representative of a portion of the river and its
history. We were also joined by a bald
eagle who upstaged our understanding host for a brief moment.

Img_1082

      

3.  Oral History Interview Logging

 

 

 Logging oral history interviews
after their completion is essential to connecting and indexing this project’s
on-going massive collection. Mark
provided the purpose and context of this activity       while Emily modeled an
appropriate logging. Yesterday’s
interview of Dave Vasarhelyi was used as an example and questions were fielded.

 

      4. Group Photo!

All photos by teacher participant John Bennet.

Loggging Template, Permission Forms, & Interview Questions

The template for logging the interviews is attached here. When finished "save as" in the following way: your name_subjectname_date. Then email to rrrinstitute@gmail.com. We will process it and add an interview number.

Download log_template.xls

We will rename the file once we have processed it.

Also attached is the project permission form.

Download permission_release rrr.pdf

We recommend reviewing the following rrr_interview_questions
and building your interview around them.

Roads to Environmental Oral History Interviews

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1. Teacher
explanations of running water pieces

 

Teachers were asked, as an example of homework, to find an example of a
running body of water from their local area, photograph it, and write a short
explanation of what it means (or meant) to them. Many teachers picked rivers, creeks, and
streams from their childhood or where they grew up. Most found more information out than they
were expecting and were excited to learn more. With yesterday’s Doan Brook tour and discussions still fresh in our mind
an excellent reflection took place during the presentations.

 

2. Interview
with Dave Vasarhelyi

 

Dr. Mark Tebeau modeled a live interview with West Creek advocate Dave Vasarhelyi. Mark, whose experience with oral history
techniques were apparent, conducted the entire interview as both a teaching and
learning tool. This included greeting
Dave properly, using a facilitator, ensuring proper sound quality, and
concluding the interview with wrap up questions.

 

Teacher participants were asked to practice active listening. They took notes, created questions for the
end, and critiqued Mark’s methodology.

 

3. Interview
with Tom Yablonsky

 

Jennie Vasaehelyi conducted an interview with Tom Yablonsky, a local
advocate for expanding the Canalway to Cleveland’s Flats area, the mouth of the
Cuyahoga River emptying into Lake Erie. 

 

Teacher participants were again asked to practice active listening. This
time the interviewer opened up the subject, Tom, to the group. The attention and interest of the teachers
became apparent as the interview continued for almost twenty minutes after
Jennie’s conclusion.

 

4. Interview
Observation and Critique Discussion

 

Teacher participants chimed in on what went well, what they were confused
about, and what they thought was problematic about Mark and Jennie’s
interview. The group as a whole
developed a better understanding of the interview process as a whole out of
this discussion. Mic placement, opening
questions, sound quality, and how to get the most interesting information out
of your subject was all discussed.

 

5. Technology
Explanation

 

Matt,
Emily, and Justin presented the technological tools needed for conducting oral
history interviews and how to use them to the group. The group was presented to first as an entire
group and then split into smaller formations based on site locations. Each teacher participant was encouraged to
use hands-on learning techniques and work with the equipment directly. 

Google Maps and Skype

My work with the RRR grant has a real learning experience.  One such learning was creating a Google Map.  I remember my awe when primary investigator, Dr. Mark Tebeau, showed us the Euclid Corridor map that he and his colleagues had created using Google Map.  A visitor could click on various spots and up popped an image and text.  It was amazing.

Dr. Tebeau presented the Euclid Corridor map at the May 15 & 16 workshop.  He challenged the participants to create their own Google maps of their neighborhoods or their school districts.  I was not present at that workshop, as I wanted to witness my son’s graduation from Penn State with his Masters of Engineering Degree.  He was chosen to deliver the commencement address…and even though he spoke for only five minutes…I didn’t want to miss it.

My role in the leadership of the grant experience is to communicate with the teachers.  And so I sent an e-mail reminding them of the assignment and encouraging them to meet the deadline.  Oh!  What a barrage of e-mail I received asking for directions and help and on and on.

I tried to create a map on my own.  I failed.  I e-mailed Andreas Johannson who immediately replied, "Anything I could offer, you can find for yourself." Just put "google maps" in your browser and follow the directions.  His encouragement gave me courage to try again.  I followed the directions and here is the map that I created: 

<http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=107613719337978519434.00044e2c4d33ced4a5c34&z=9>

I was so happy!  I called my husband Tony to the computer and I demonstrated my map.  When my son Timothy stopped by on his way home from teaching at Wooster High School, I took him to the computer and I showed him my map.  Immediately, Timothy began thinking of ways he could use the map in his classroom.  Tony said, "Jann!  You could create a Google map with a stop for every single participant in the RRR grant!"

The e-mail I wrote to the participants next said: "I did it!  If this old dog can do it, YOU CAN!  Put Google Maps in your browser.  Follow the directions.  E-mail me your map when you’re done."

Tony Nigro’s map was so personal.  His Google map was located in Florida.  I glimpsed Tony’s life as I explored his map.

<http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=117976918838514145679.00044e720e49c8522dc5f&ll=40.866795,-82.684479&spn=0.492262,0.928345&z=10&iwloc=00044e72aa0c384f166bc>

John Bennett used different icons to mark the spots in his map:

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=116047778899859281176.00044ea3fd5357d49d2e3&z=13

Dawn Cancellerie incorporated images in her Google Map:

<http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=107976964828155755775.00044d940df10101b17d3&z=13>

I kept checking e-mail to see who had send me a map and what they had included in it.  Perhaps one of the most exciting conversations I had was with Jed McKnight.  He said, "I am thinking that students could make a Google map of Sherman’s march to the sea."

That’s what I enjoy most about our RRR group.  They are able to learn new information, strategies and techniques AND they are able to transfer them to their classroom to make learning history more active and more effective.

Hooray for all who completed the assignment!

I had still not recovered from all this exciting learning, when John Bennett and I skyped!  Oh, my!  I was able to see and hear John.  Through the computer, John introduced me to his wife and his dog.  What fun.  While we talked through the computer, John looked up websites for me that sold web cameras.  With a web camera hooked up to my USB port and mounted on my computer, I could be visible to John while we skyped.  Just think, I could also talk…and see my grandchildren who live in Colorado and Pennsylvania.

John was not the first person to tell me how much he was enjoying the DOAN BROOK HANDBOOK, the book we’d sent out for preparation for the Summer Institute.  He was the first one, however, who told me about completing the assignment to compare fresh and flowing water in your neighborhood to the Doan Brook.  "I have learned so much!  I can not wait to share it," he said. 

I, too, have been reading the book and working on the assignment.  I, too, am excited about what I have learned about a small creek that served as a playground for my four children.  How I took that unassuming creek for granted!

The first day for the Summer Institute is June 16.  We will share fresh and flowing water in our neighborhoods and we will visit the Doan Brook.  More about that later.

Randall Park Mall To Close

From WEWS, via an email from Mike King.

Link: http://www.newsnet5.com/news/16360252/detail.html

POSTED: 7:44 am EDT May 22,
2008

UPDATED: 8:02 am EDT May 22,
2008

NORTH RANDALL, Ohio — The
mayor in the Cleveland suburb of North Randall says a local mall once touted as
the world’s largest will be closing in three weeks.

Mayor David Smith said owners
of the 32-year-old Randall Park Mall have given its few remaining tenants until
June 12 to go out of business themselves or relocate to empty storefronts
nearby.

Smith calls the mall’s demise
"an opportunity waiting to happen."

He said different investors
have expressed interest in either redeveloping the buildings or tearing them
down and putting up an industrial park.

When it opened southeast of
Cleveland in 1976, Randall Park had more than 200 stores. Now, it’s mostly
empty; major department stores. Dillard’s, Macy’s and J.C. Penney have all
left, and only Sears remains.

More Stories about the Closing:

http://blog.cleveland.com/business/2008/05/cars_packed_the_parking_lot.html

http://blog.cleveland.com/business/2008/05/magic_is_gone_in_north_randall.html

http://ech.case.edu/ech-cgi/article.pl?id=RPM

 

 

Quick Review of Three Mini-Grants

I was delighted to read John Bennett’s RRR post about his RRR mini-grant.  I have been wanting to visit his classroom to see the excitement with my own eyes.  He promised me that we could SKYPE if I found it impossible to visit.  John claims that Skype will be the next best thing.

Skype is a new technology that I just learned from another participant.  Roni Yaxley called to tell me that Ohio author, Shelley Pearsall, agreed to return to her elementary school in Euclid, Ohio.  Shelley had been there last year as a part of Roni’s mini-grant.  Shelley had met with parents and teachers in an after-school workshop.  The students had read Shelley’s book, TROUBLE DON’T LAST, and they had created a blog about what they’d learned about the Underground Railroad.  Shelley was impressed with their work, and wanted to encourage the students to keep reading.

Roni asked Shelley if she would agree to Skype with the students.  Shelley said, "I don’t have any idea what that is."  Roni explained that Skype was a free software that allowed real time and voice "chats."  In addition, with a camera hooked to the computer monitor, Skyping parties could also see each other.  Shelley said she thought that would be fun!  I did, too, and I immediately set up my own Skype account so that when John Bennett is read to call me and show me his classroom complete with the train track, I will be set to hear his students and see their work.

Recently, my husband and I took our bikes to the tow path in Akron near the Mustill Store.  That’s where we fortuitously and happily met Steve Testa and Karen Grindall and their students.  The two teachers had authored another collaborative mini-grant linking Steve’s high school class from Nordonia Hills with Karen’s sixth-grade class from Akron.  How surprised Karen and Steve were to see us.  They invited Tony and me to join them for pizza picnic along the tow path. 

Tony and I witnessed high school students sitting with sixth-grade students engaged in conversation.  I heard first-hand about the great field trip they’d been on that day.  They’d been to see the new lofts that overlooked the Ohio & Erie Canal.  From there, the students could see Akron spread out below them.  The students also visited the Hope 6 buildings.  "The student saw the difference between private money and public money," said Karen.  At the Mustill Store the students learned the importance of the canal in making Akron what it is today.

"Oh, I forgot to tell you," said Karen.  "We began our field trip in John Bennett’s room before we loaded the bus.  I’d told my students that RRR grant money paid for their experience today, and I’d told them that Mr. Bennett used his grant money in a different way.  Of course, they wanted to see it.  I wish you could have seen the first-grade students proudly showing off the train track in their room to the sixth-grade students."

Regular readers of my RRR blog entries will recognize this as a magic moment for me.  Connection!  Connection!  Connection!  John Bennett’s class connected with Karen Grindall’s class and Karen Grindall’s class connected with Steve Testa’s.  Roni Yaxley’s class connected with Shelley Pearsall, and I am now connected to Roni’s class and John’s class via Skype.  All of this happened because of the RRR grant.  For me, it doesn’t get much better. 

Steve Testa’s note of thanks arrived several days later.  It was the icing on the cake.  He wrote, "Your presence made this the best field trip ever!" 

Ah!  Life IS beautiful.  Who knew the RRR experience would be so wonderful?

The Orphan Trains: Cleveland and Room 204

My dream was to bring a train into my classroom and expose my students to the real world of trains and the history of trains and the rails in our local area. After getting the “high-ball” (go-ahead) on my classroom grant, I began building the research base to support the lessons in class. I went to the Main Library downtown and grabbed as many children’s train books, videos and DVDs that they would allow and brought them home. One of the books in that tall stack was about orphan trains. I had never heard about this period in our history and started to read the book. I could not put the book down and once finished, I went to the Internet and started my search for more information. My searches lead me to a PBS documentary, more children’s non-fiction books as well as a story by a Newberry Award winner. I ordered that book from B&N and once delivered, read it in one day because it was that good. My wife took it to her middle school and it has been circulating through the English department. I also found a primary book by Eve Bunting called Train to Somewhere. I read that story to the class and had a deep discussion about being an orphan and riding the rails to Somewhere. Since Rivers Roads and Rails was the framework for this grant I began to search to see if the orphan trains went through our area. As of this time I found one reference from a diary of a woman who traveled with the New York children through Cleveland on the Nickel Plated Railroad. It was thrilling to hear the voice of someone who did travel through our area on her way west with a group of children in hopes of providing them with a fresh start in life.  “Track” our experience with the daily exposure of a MTH O-scale, 2-8-0 Baltimore and Ohio passenger train running in the classroom. “Couple” that with a ride on the Cuyahoga Scenic Railroad and you have a very successful Rivers, Roads and Rails grant project.

Resources:
Letter Written by CAS Agent Anna Laura Hill: (search word – Cleveland) http://www.orphantrainriders.com/overseers11.html

Documentary:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/orphan/

Children’s Aid Society:

http://www.childrensaidsociety.org/

Rozinda by Georgene Bramlage:

http://young-adult-fiction.suite101.com/article.cfm/rodzina

East Side Tour

Driving Directions: East Side Tour (Thursday)

Link: <http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&hl=en&geocode=9641602211625344856,41.487879,-81.651618&saddr=som+center+rd+%26+solon+rd&daddr=E+55th+St+%4041.487879,+-81.651618+to:woodland+ave.+and+martin+luther+king+jr.+dr.+to:Euclid+Ave.+and+Martin+Luther+King+Jr.+Dr.+to:euclid+ave.+and+superior+rd.+to:coventry+rd.+and+euclid+heights+blvd.+to:Euclid+Heights+Blvd.+and+Derbyshire+Rd.+to:Coventry+Rd.+and+Fairhill+Rd.+to:Shaker+Square+to:Shaker+Lakes+Nature+Center+to:fairmount+blvd.+and+south+taylor+rd.+to:south+taylor+rd.+and+mayfield+rd.+to:mayfield+rd.+and+warrensville+center+rd.+to:warrensville+center+rd.+and+emery+rd.+to:20801+Miles+Rd,+Cleveland,+OH+44128+(Randall+Park+Mall)+to:northfield+rd.+and+miles+rd.+to:cedar+rd.+and+chagrin+river+rd.+to:south+franklin+st.+and+chagrin+river+rd.+to:som+center+rd.+and+solon+rd.&mra=pe&mrcr=17&sll=36.219625,-83.30187&sspn=13.225389,22.895508&ie=UTF8&ll=41.452505,-81.446457&spn=0.384437,0.715485&z=11>

Start address: Som Center Rd & Solon Rd Solon, OH 44139
End address: Som Center Rd & Solon Rd Solon, OH 44139

Start at: Som Center Rd & Solon Rd Solon, OH 44139

1. Head north on Som Center Rd - 0.2 mi
2. Merge onto US-422 W via the ramp to Cleveland - 6.5 mi
3. Merge onto I-480 W - 5.6 mi
4. Take exit 20A/20B to merge onto I-77 N toward Cleveland - 5.1 mi
5. Take exit 161B toward E 55th St - 0.5 mi
6. Merge onto I-490 E - 0.2 mi
7. Turn left at E 55th St - 0.6 mi

Arrive at: E 55th St

8. Head north on E 55th St toward Woodland Ave - 33 ft
9. Turn right at Woodland Ave - 2.6 mi

Arrive at: Martin Luther King Jr Dr & Woodland Ave Cleveland, OH

10. Head east toward Martin Luther King Jr Dr - 59 ft
11. Turn left at Martin Luther King Jr Dr - 1.3 mi

Arrive at: Euclid Ave & Martin Luther King Jr Dr Cleveland, OH 44106

12. Head northeast on Euclid Ave toward East Blvd - 1.7 mi

Arrive at: Euclid Ave & Superior Rd Cleveland, OH 44112

13. Head east on Superior Rd toward Lambert St - 0.5 mi
14. Turn right at Coventry Rd - 0.8 mi

Arrive at: Coventry Rd & Euclid Heights Blvd Cleveland, OH

15. Head west on Euclid Heights Blvd toward Lancashire Rd - 0.8 mi

Arrive at: Euclid Heights Blvd & Derbyshire Rd Cleveland, OH 44106

16. Head south on Derbyshire Rd toward Euclid Heights Blvd - 302 ft
17. Continue on Surrey Rd - 0.1 mi
18. Turn left at Cedar Rd - 171 ft
19. Slight right at Fairmount Blvd - 0.9 mi
20. Continue on Coventry Rd - 0.2 mi

Arrive at: Coventry Rd & Fairhill Rd Cleveland, OH 44120

21. Head southwest on Fairhill Rd toward S Park Blvd - 0.2 mi
22. Turn left at N Moreland Blvd - 0.5 mi
23. Turn right at Shaker Square - 0.2 mi

Arrive at: Shaker Square Cleveland, OH 44120

24. Head north on Shaker Square toward Shaker Blvd - 289 ft
25. Turn right at N Moreland Blvd - 0.2 mi
26. Turn right at Larchmere Blvd - 0.6 mi
27. Slight left at N Woodland Rd - 0.2 mi
28. Slight right at N Park Blvd - 7 ft

Arrive at: Nature Center At Shaker Lakes 2600 S Park Blvd Cleveland, OH 44120

29. Head east on N Park Blvd toward N Woodland Rd - 102 ft
30. Slight left at N Woodland Rd - 0.2 mi
31. Slight right at Fairmount Blvd - 0.8 mi

Arrive at: Fairmount Blvd & S Taylor Rd Cleveland, OH 44118

32. Head north on S Taylor Rd toward Fairmount Blvd - 2.3 mi

Arrive at: Mayfield Rd & S Taylor Rd Cleveland, OH 44118

33. Head east on Mayfield Rd toward Yellowstone Rd - 1.0 mi

Arrive at: Mayfield Rd & Warrensville Center Rd Cleveland, OH 44121

34. Head south on Warrensville Center Rd toward Herold Rd - 3.7 mi
35. Turn right at Farnsleigh Rd - 0.2 mi
36. Turn left at Van Aken Blvd - 0.2 mi
37. Slight right at Warrensville Center Rd - 2.0 mi

Arrive at: Warrensville Center Rd & Emery Rd Cleveland, OH 44128

38. Head south on Warrensville Center Rd - 0.2 mi
39. Turn left - 184 ft
40. Turn right toward Miles Rd - 0.4 mi
41. Turn right toward Miles Rd - 217 ft
42. Turn right at Miles Rd - 194 ft

Arrive at: Randall Park Mall 20801 Miles Rd Cleveland, OH 44128

43. Head west on Miles Rd - 0.3 mi
44. Slight right to merge onto Warrensville Center Rd - 0.2 mi
45. Turn right to merge onto Miles Rd/OH-43 - 0.8 mi

Arrive at: Northfield Rd & Miles Rd Cleveland, OH 44128

46. Head east on Miles Rd toward Derbyshire Dr/N Randall Dr - 0.3 mi
47. Turn left to merge onto US-422 E toward Solon/I-271 N - 0.8 mi
48. Take the exit on the left onto I-271 N/US-422 W toward US-422 W/Erie PA  Continue to follow I-271 N - 5.3 mi
49. Take exit 32 for Brainard Rd/Cedar Rd - 0.1 mi
50. Keep left at the fork, follow signs for Brainard Rd/Cedar Rd E - 0.1 mi
51. Turn right at Brainard Rd - 410 ft
52. Turn left at Cedar Rd - 3.8 mi

Arrive at: Cedar Rd & Chagrin River Rd OH

53. Head south on Chagrin River Rd toward Burton Trail - 3.0 mi
54. Turn left at S Woodland Rd - 0.4 mi
55. Continue on Falls Rd - 0.7 mi
56. Turn right at N Main St - 1.3 mi
57. Turn right at N Franklin St - 2.3 mi

Arrive at: S Franklin St & Chagrin River Rd Chagrin Falls, OH 44023

58. Head northwest on Chagrin River Rd toward Holbrook Rd - 1.5 mi
59. Turn left at Solon Rd - 2.1 mi

Arrive at: Som Center Rd & Solon Rd Solon, OH 44139

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West Side Tour

Driving Directions: West Side Tour (Friday)

Link: <http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&hl=en&geocode=4791285309051798099,41.474591,-81.730240%3B11134961514279254303,41.418724,-81.850029%3B3055180918573364653,41.430912,-81.851938%3B17101577942528567226,41.450329,-81.839741%3B14611595211620138913,41.461550,-81.852710%3B2462380013643509467,41.456030,-81.902200%3B1136582932946125090,41.469089,-81.901688&saddr=detroit+rd.+at+columbia+rd.&daddr=Lorain+Ave+%4041.474591,+-81.730240+to:Lorain+Ave+at+W+25th+St+to:Abbey+Ave+at+W+11th+St+to:Clark+Ave+at+W+14th+St+to:Clark+Ave+%26+W+25th+St+to:State+Rd+%26+W+Ridgewood+Dr+to:Pearl+Rd+%26+Smith+Rd+to:sheldon+Rd+%26+Engle+Rd+to:Brookpark+Rd+%4041.418724,+-81.850029+to:Metro+Parks+Valley+Pkwy%2FValley+Pkwy+%4041.430912,+-81.851938+to:Mastick+Rd+%4041.450329,+-81.839741+to:W+210th+St+%4041.461550,+-81.852710+to:Center+Ridge+Rd+%4041.456030,+-81.902200+to:Columbia+Rd+%4041.469089,+-81.901688+to:crocker+rd+%26+detroit+rd&mra=pi&mrcr=10&via=9,10,12,13&sll=41.448517,-81.859646&sspn=0.092256,0.113297&ie=UTF8&ll=41.43552,-81.819305&spn=0.358286,0.666046&z=11>

Start address: Detroit Rd & Columbia Rd Westlake, OH 44145
End address: Detroit Rd & Crocker Rd Westlake, OH 44145

Start at: Detroit Rd & Columbia Rd Westlake, OH 44145

1. Head north on Columbia Rd toward Exit 159 - 295 ft
2. Merge onto I-90 E/OH-2 E via the ramp to Cleveland  Continue to follow I-90 E - 7.6 mi
3. Take exit 167 for West Blvd toward OH-10/Lorain Ave - 0.2 mi
4. Turn right at West Blvd - 0.1 mi
5. Turn left at Lorain Ave - 1.4 mi

Arrive at: Lorain Ave

6. Head northeast on Lorain Ave toward W 65th St - 1.5 mi

Arrive at: Lorain Ave & W 25th St Cleveland, OH 44113

7. Head northeast on Lorain Ave toward W 24th St - 0.3 mi
8. Turn right at W 20th St - 0.1 mi
9. Turn left at Abbey Ave - 0.5 mi

Arrive at: W 11th St & Abbey Ave Cleveland, OH 44113

10. Head south on W 11th St toward Pelton Ct - 0.1 mi
11. Turn right at Fairfield Ave - 0.1 mi
12. Turn left at W 14th St - 0.8 mi

Arrive at: Clark Ave & W 14th St Cleveland, OH

13. Head west on Clark Ave toward W 16th St - 0.4 mi

Arrive at: W 25th St & Clark Ave Cleveland, OH

14. Head south on W 25th St toward Buckeye Ct - 1.0 mi
15. Continue on Pearl Rd - 1.2 mi
16. Slight left at State Rd - 3.5 mi

Arrive at: State Rd & W Ridgewood Dr Cleveland, OH 44134

17. Head south on State Rd toward W Ridgewood Dr - 0.1 mi
18. Turn right at W Ridgewood Dr - 2.6 mi
19. Turn right at York Rd - 0.4 mi
20. Turn left at Pearl Rd - 1.7 mi

Arrive at: Pearl Rd & Smith Rd Cleveland, OH 44130

21. Head northwest on Smith Rd toward S Pkwy Dr - 1.1 mi
22. Turn left at Sheldon Rd - 1.0 mi

Arrive at: Engle Rd & Sheldon Rd OH

23. Head north on Engle Rd toward Independence Ct - 2.1 mi
24. Turn left at Brookpark Rd - 2.4 mi
25. Turn right at W 220th St - 374 ft
26. Turn right at Brookway Dr - 0.4 mi
27. Turn left at Metro Parks Valley Pkwy/Valley Pkwy  Continue to follow Valley Pkwy - 2.3 mi
28. Turn left at Mastick Rd - 0.2 mi

Arrive at: Mastick Rd

29. Head north on Mastick Rd toward Lorain Rd - 85 ft
30. Turn left at Lorain Rd - 0.7 mi
31. Turn right at W 210th St - 1.1 mi
32. Turn left at Center Ridge Rd - 2.7 mi
33. Turn right at Columbia Rd - 0.9 mi

Arrive at: Columbia Rd

34. Head north on Columbia Rd toward Detroit Rd - 384 ft
35. Turn left at Detroit Rd - 2.6 mi

Arrive at: Detroit Rd & Crocker Rd Westlake, OH 44145

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